garlic wine and butter steamed clams

One of my most loved things — albeit, truly, it is difficult to pick — we ate in Portugal was little shellfishes cooked in a garlic wine sauce, more often than not with cilantro and constantly just eaten with bread, which I realized when we went to one of those* eateries on the shoreline one night where you pick your supper from what’s been gotten that day and everybody is somewhat unclear about arrangements since they expect you definitely know. “How are the shellfishes arranged?” “What do you mean? Steamed!” “And they’re presented with… ?” “Well, in Portugal, we eat shellfishes with bread, just bread. Would you like something else?” And so it was.
what you'll need

The dish, called Amêijoas à Bulhão Pato, is named after the 19th century Lisbon poet Bulhão Pato, who was known to be a gourmand. It’s usually a first course. And, no, this isn’t officially it — unable to follow the simplest directions, I replaced the olive oil with butter, threw in some shallots, used parsley instead of cilantro because I killed my cilantro already and added red pepper flakes. But we did eat it with bread. And more of the wine (I mean, the bottle was now open so we were basically obligated) and intentionally or not, managed to unlock my new favorite date night dinner, even if you are sharing your table with little people disinterested in wine-steamed clams.

soaking the clams
butter and shallots and garlic and so much yes
into the pan
opening (not ready yet)

Wait, hear me out. Once your clams are clean, this is a 7-minute meal. You get to eat garlic, wine and butter steamed tiny sweet clams over grilled bread with a fistful of fresh herbs and little tumbler wine on the side and it feels like you should be in a restaurant overlooking a beach sunset somewhere and not your junior four in the East Village with a view of the guy who yells at the trash can all day. I know I claim to be wildly opposed to cooking separate meals for the younger and older components of your family (I am! I am!) but if one was ever to make an exception, to just make them the tortellini or fish sticks or grilled chicken and broccoli they’d rather have anyway, I vote for this, something that feels indulgent and luxurious despite being light and quick. And I vote for you to make these tonight.

ladling the wine/garlic/butter sauce over
steamed clams with wine, garlic and butter

* (because they’re everywhere and this is why Portugal must be heaven)

 

Garlic, Wine and Butter Steamed Clams

  • SERVINGS: FOR 2
  • TIME: CLEANING TIME + 7 MINUTES
  • 1 1/2 pounds small (I used Manila) clams
  • 2 thick slices country or sourdough bread
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil to brush bread (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced or minced
  • 1 large or 2 small shallots, minced or 1/4 cup minced white onion
  • Salt and red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh herbs — parsley, cilantro, chives or a mix
  • 1 lemon, in wedges

If you think your clams may not be clean, wash them first: Fill a large bowl with cool tap water and place the clams in it. Let them soak for 20 minutes during which they’ll expel any sand and grit.While they’re soaking, grill or broil your bread: Dab both sides lightly with olive oil, if using, and grill or broil until well-toasted on both sides.

Lightly scrub your clams. Discard any with chipped shells.

In a large saute pan with a lid, melt butter and add garlic, shallots, salt and pepper flakes. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes over medium-high. Add wine — and as soon as it simmers, add all the clams and cover with a lid. In three minutes, almost all should be wide open; discard any that do not open. Transfer to a bowl and ladle cooking liquid over. Scatter with herbs and serve with grilled bread and lemon.

via [Smitten Kitchen]

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